Many people who see our adds or speak to us for the first time seem rather surprised to find out that there is some great fishing to be had over in Portugal! So many know the country for it's beaches and that is about all, which is a great pity.Very few have had the chance to see what lies beyond the well known Algarve. Untouched by the many tourists who visit the south, the areas where we go fishing, offer our clients a chance not only to fish in almost untouched waters, but also the chance to see the unspoilt areas of Portugal!



But, that is enough about that. It is the fishing that you are after, so let us get on with telling you about it!

To see what you can expect to catch take a look at our Carp Gallery

What there is

In the rivers you can find barbel, a wide variety of carp, Wels catfish, pike, nase, tench, lamprey and eels. The reservoirs hold tench (9.2kg), carp (34.5Kg) and large-mouth bass. You stand a good chance of hooking into something BIG! So, some thought should go into planning what sort of angling you will be doing and what sort of tackle to bring along with you. To find out more, click on the links below.

If you would like to have a complete list of the fish that are found in Portugal just click here and save the PDF file to your system. FISH-LIST

If you have not got Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your system already, just click on the Adobe link to get your free copy:

Where most of the fishing takes place.


Between the region of Lisbon and the Algarve in the south lies the region of Alentejo. This thinly populated region covers a large area of Portugal ñ nearly a third of its total area ñ and is well worth exploring. The scenery is rural and hilly, with olive orchards, cork oak orchards, golden cornfields, and vineyards. The landscape becomes dryer and flatter towards the south. Alentejo has a beautiful rugged coast, with secluded inlets, cliffs, and sand dunes.

It is also an interesting region for monuments and historic, fortified towns. There are remnants from prehistoric times, such as stone circles and dolmens. You will come across some walled towns on hilltops, evidence of past wars against the Moorish people. It's great fun spending some time in one of the historic towns, during your visit to Alentejo. Such as the Mediaeval Monsaraz or the white village of Marv„o. The health resort town of Castelo de Vide is also well worth a visit. Here, you can walk through the steep, winding roads of the Jewish Quarter, visit the 13th century synagogue, or visit the Mediaeval fortress. And then there is, of course, the UNESCO town of Évora. There are some natural parks, such as the Parque Natural da Serra de S. Mamede in the North ñ from the peak of the S. Mamede (1025 m) you will have panoramic views across the region- and the Parque Natural do Vale do Guadiana, and the Parque Natural do Sudoeste Alentejano e Costa Vicentina on the coast.

Beaches can be found near the seaside resort of Vila Nova de Milfontes, the picturesque fishing village of Porto Covo, the island Ilha do Pessegueiro, as well as near Praia do Malhão, Almograve, Zambujeira do Mar, Carvalhal, and Odeceixe. Or you can cool off at one of the reservoirs further inland.

Alentejo is also a wine region, its fruity wines have a very good reputation. They come in three main white and 3 main red wine types. Roupeiro, Rabo de Ovelha, Antão Vaz, and reds: Periquita, Trincadeira, Aragonez. Other local produce includes cheeses, sausages, honey, and olive oil.

The Alentejo is also the region where most of the biggest and best lakes are and it is here that most of our clients end up for their angling holidays.

Night Fishing

At the moment night fishing is not allowed here in Portugal nor is "Wild Camping" (what they call any form of camping which is not done within an official campsite). Although there are some people and another angling company offering "Night fishing and Camping" on some of the lakes over here, if a person is caught doing either or both of these the conserquences can be heavy. Not only do you lose all your fishing tackle and camping gear, you also get fined and you could even get a prison sentence. As you can see it really is not worth the risk.

What to take

Just your fishing tackle, suntan lotion and a hat. There are three angling laws that will effect what tackle you take. Firstly, no night fishing is allowed, so no bivvies or beds are needed. Secondly, there is a limit of two rods per angler when fishing. And thirdly, keep nets must be at least 3m (10ft) in length and have a diameter or diagonal of at least 50cm (20in).

As mentioned in the on other pages and above, you stand a good chance of hooking something BIG. So if you are after something big, we suggest that you bring along tackle that will be able to handle the long hard battles that you will encounter! You have been warned!

Due to the long hot summers, it would be wise to bring along light clothes and a hat to protect yourself from the strong sun. Plus, it would be wise to bring along some sun-block, at least factor 30! It is no fun having to spend some of your hard-earned holiday in a hospital because of sunburn! Mosquitos do exist in Portugal, so to avoid any hassle from these little pests, make sure that you bring along some sort of repellant. "Johnson's Off" lotion is one of the most effective.

The winters are shorter and a lot milder compared to those of the UK. That does not mean that it does not rain or get cold. So, if your holiday is going to be during winter, make sure that you bring a good lightweight waterproof jacket/coat and a jumper or two. To get an idea of the weather throughout the year, take a look at the charts on the following page: 'What's the weather like...?'

By the way, do not forget to bring your camera!

Rod Transportation

A lot of anglers seem to be worried whenever traveling by plane about their fishing rods and we always end up advising them in getting themselves a hard-shell rod case. Nothing protects equipment like a hard shell case. Some airlines will no longer take responsibility for broken rods when packed in a soft nylon bag.

Breakage does happen, so why run the risk of having to deal with it on a sunny day when the fish are biting!? Why worry about damage to expensive rods and reels packed in a soft nylon case?

All Sportube cases are accepted by the airlines.
In fact, certain airlines are actually supporting the use of hard cases by including in their Contract of Carriage verbiage such as:
Liability release form required on plastic [bag]/ soft [nylon] ski bags only. Execution of liability release form not required on hard-shell cases. For more information check out the SporTube web site.

Carp fishing in Portugal

Most of the reservoirs where we take our clients hold carp to 34.5kg (76.05Lbs)! So there is agood chance of you catching a fish of a lifetime in Portugal. The mirror carp are not that unlike those caught in the UK. The common carp, on the other hand, are rather different to those found in the UK! The main difference in these commons is their length. They seem to be far more streamlined and longer than those found in the UK and other European countries (Some seem so long that they are often thought to be barbel at first glance!). In some ways they resemble giant wild carp. There are also some good size wildies to be had too. The one in the carp gallery, which was caught in October 2001, weighed 6.1kg (13.42Lbs). It was caught with a single 18mm fish-meal boilie, which had been in a dip for a few weeks, on a staight-forward bolt-rig. There had been no pre-baiting and there were no free offerings either. Andy Little was over here during October 2006, to read what his what he wrote in one of two articles for the Angler''s Mail go here

Fishing for Carp

Any good carp rod with a 2.5Lb test curve, fitted with a good strong and reliable reel, will do. But, due to the size of most of these waters in Portugal, rods and reels that will enable you to cast big distances (although not always necessary) might be a good idea. As for what type of line to use, any decent mono will do. Mind you, braid really works well here in Portugal!

When it comes to what type of rigs to use in Portugal, you do not need to worry. Because most of these Portuguese carp have never been caught, you do not have to worry about fancy rigs/hook links in Portugal.Straight forward braid or mono hook links are just the job. A basic bolt-rig with a bottom or poped-up bait will get the results. When it comes to what hooks to use, well, just remember that these carp are a lot tougher than their British cousins, so good strong carp hooks are a must. Something like Fox''s "Series 2XS" in the following sizes will do: #4, #6 and #8. It would be a good idea if you were to use barbless hooks due to the fact that these fish have very tough mouths and lips! One thing that you will not have to worry about is too much weed in the waters. The only weed that we seem to come across is nice and small, just covering some of the lake''s bed.

Baits!

Now this is easy. As mentioned above, most of these carp have never seen a hook, let alone a bait! Sweet corn, luncheon meat, pellets and even paste all work well. But, by far, the boilie is the best! What''s more, the Portuguese carp take to them straight away without having to do loads of pre-baiting. All types of boilies work, but for the best results, fish-meals are a better choice, they are rather partial to them. We have found that Nutrabaits "Big Fish Mix" range do really well! By the way, the "Method" does extremely well over in Portugal!

There are two things that might be worth taking into consideration. Although we do not have to contend with "Poison Chat" here in Portugal, we do have two terrors to deal with. Red-Signal Crayfish and Terrapins! Once these find your hook-bait they will destroy it. Sometimes, if you are using smallish baits, you might even end up with a terrapin actually on your hook! So if you are going to use boilies, we recommend that you use sizes from 18mm up and really hard ones. Air-dried boilies would be a safe bet.

If you are now wondering as to what tackle to bring over, don't worry too much. The same as you would use in the UK will do for carping over here in Portugal.

Night Fishing

At the moment night fishing is not allowed here in Portugal nor is "Wild Camping" (what they call any form of camping which is not done within an official campsite). If a person is caught doing either or both of these the conserquences can be heavy. Not only do you lose all your fishing tackle and camping gear, you also get fined and you could even get a prison sentence. As you can see it really is not worth the risk. Saying that, I and a bunch of other local anglers over here are in the process of trying to get the old law changed.

Yes, there are Wels Catfish here in Portugal too!

For many years we have been telling people that they are here, but because of the lack of photographic evidence, many called us liars etc and so we decided to keep quiet about it until we could prove it. Lets just say we've proved it.



If it is Wels that you are after please get in contact with us for more details.

We will say this, as fishing for them is very new over here, you could look at it as pioneering. We really can not say for sure what there is out there, but by what has been found out so far, there could well be some very big surprises install.

Barbel fishing in Portugal.

The barbel in Portugal are not like those found in the U.K.. There are at least 5 species which are found in Portugal. They are the Iberian Barbel (Barbus bocagei), Southern Barbel (Barbus sclateri), Small-Headed Barbel (Barbus microcephalus), Steindachner Barbel (Barbus steinbachneri) and the Snouted Iberian Barbel (Barbus comizo) otherwise known as the Comizo Barbel. Some of these fish can grow to weights which would smash any barbel records in the U.K.. The fish in the photo on the bottom weighed 12kg (26.4Lbs!). Catches of fish around the 12kg mark (26.4Lbs) and above are often reported and back in 1996 a fish weighing 18.7kg (41.14Lbs) was caught by a local angler on one of the rivers where we often go.

Fishing For Barbel

To go for these barbel we would advise you to use tackle which will be capable of standing up to the sort of fight which these fish will give. Any good barbel/specialist rod with a test curve of 1.5Lb or above fitted with a strong reliable reel would be a wise choice. Although, saying that, when Andy Little was over here back in 2006, he used his carp gear (2.75Lbers) while fishing for the barbel. To read what his what he wrote in one of two articles for the Angler''s Mail go here.

As to what line, well a very good mono will do of cause, but in our opinion the humble braid would be a far better choice! Hooks? Well, that is a good question! The local anglers in Portugal use hooks that you would use for sea fishing! Maybe that is why they do not catch as many as they could. We would advise you to bring along good strong specialist hooks in the following sizes: #8, #6 and #4 (Barbless would be a better option because these fish tend to have very tough mouths/lips.).

What style/method to use for these barbel? Well, the local Portuguese barbel anglers just use straight forward ledgering methods to catch their fish. But, in our opinion, what really works well is good feeder or "Method" tactics!

Baits! Now, this is how those of you who live and fish for barbel in the U.K. can gain the upper hand! Over in Portugal the barbel anglers tend to use very basic baits. Worms, maggots and worms! The bait technology has yet to reach Portugal. So, good strong smelly fish-meal boilies, pellets, nugets, pastes and even the good old sweet corn and lunchon-meat etc. will really make a difference. Also, hardly any Portuguese angler uses ground bait when going for barbel! Maybe that is why a simple hemp and fish-meal mix really pays off.

Night Fishing

At the moment night fishing is not allowed here in Portugal nor is "Wild Camping" (what they call any form of camping which is not done within an official campsite). If a person is caught doing either or both of these the conserquences can be heavy. Not only do you lose all your fishing tackle and camping gear, you also get fined and you could even get a prison sentence. As you can see it really is not worth the risk. Saying that, there are a bunch of us local anglers over here in the process of trying to get the old law changed.

 

Trout Fishing.

Portugal has quite a lot to offer in terms of wild trout waters, in fact there is something very special to be found over here.

To find out more, that is if big Wild Brown Trout is what takes your fancy, please visit our sister site dedicate to just trout fishing here in Portugal:

Brown Trout In Portugal.